Top 6 Ways You Can Support a New Mum

Wondering how to best support the new mums in your life? Here are six practical and genuinely helpful things you can do to take the pressure off.

Ask questions and follow up!

Of course, conversations are easily all about baby, but when was the last time you asked Mum how she's feeling, physically and mentally? Instead of settling for a one-word answer, go a step further and offer a line of support just in case she needs it.

Suggest an outing

Every person's comfort level is different regarding when, how, and even if they'd like to get out of the house. Simply asking if she'd like to take a walk, go to the park, or go for a drive may be just what she needs. Be sensitive to her recovery of the birth experience though, because her endurance and strength may be limited. Move slow and easy, and let her lead!

Offer to do specific tasks

Bring food or groceries, do laundry, go for a walk, clean, or change the bedding. You doing these little tasks means she has a moment to herself or to bond with her baby.

Schedule phone calls

Calling on the phone doesn't put pressure on the new mum to tidy up. Phone calls are easy, so don't be afraid to reach out, especially if you don’t live nearby. One of the unexpected burdens of the postpartum experience seems to be the unanticipated loneliness we feel as mums. Our spouse tends to go back to work, our baby doesn't talk or smile back much yet, and there we are alone, in our house, figuring things out.

Offer to be her postpartum advocate

It’s critical for her to keep her post-delivery doctor appointments, but getting there with a baby is tough. Offer to stay with Baby while she goes, or offer to go with her to appointments as her second pair of hands and ears. Having a helper there means she won’t be rushed or distracted if her baby starts to fuss. It’s vital she has time to discuss all she needs to with her doctor.

Set your timer for visits

Days with a newborn are busy with laundry, cleaning, and responding to friends and family members. Visitors are wonderful, but can also be draining sometimes. Limit visits to 30 minutes to an hour at a time. Adult conversations and connections are so valuable, but can also add stress when fatigue is a big factor. Watch the clock, and don't overstay your welcome!

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Top 6 Ways You Can Support a New Mum

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Wondering how to best support the new mums in your life? Here are six practical and genuinely helpful things you can do to take the pressure off.

Ask questions and follow up!

Of course, conversations are easily all about baby, but when was the last time you asked Mum how she's feeling, physically and mentally? Instead of settling for a one-word answer, go a step further and offer a line of support just in case she needs it.

Suggest an outing

Every person's comfort level is different regarding when, how, and even if they'd like to get out of the house. Simply asking if she'd like to take a walk, go to the park, or go for a drive may be just what she needs. Be sensitive to her recovery of the birth experience though, because her endurance and strength may be limited. Move slow and easy, and let her lead!

Offer to do specific tasks

Bring food or groceries, do laundry, go for a walk, clean, or change the bedding. You doing these little tasks means she has a moment to herself or to bond with her baby.

Schedule phone calls

Calling on the phone doesn't put pressure on the new mum to tidy up. Phone calls are easy, so don't be afraid to reach out, especially if you don’t live nearby. One of the unexpected burdens of the postpartum experience seems to be the unanticipated loneliness we feel as mums. Our spouse tends to go back to work, our baby doesn't talk or smile back much yet, and there we are alone, in our house, figuring things out.

Offer to be her postpartum advocate

It’s critical for her to keep her post-delivery doctor appointments, but getting there with a baby is tough. Offer to stay with Baby while she goes, or offer to go with her to appointments as her second pair of hands and ears. Having a helper there means she won’t be rushed or distracted if her baby starts to fuss. It’s vital she has time to discuss all she needs to with her doctor.

Set your timer for visits

Days with a newborn are busy with laundry, cleaning, and responding to friends and family members. Visitors are wonderful, but can also be draining sometimes. Limit visits to 30 minutes to an hour at a time. Adult conversations and connections are so valuable, but can also add stress when fatigue is a big factor. Watch the clock, and don't overstay your welcome!