Processing the Emotions of Fertility Treatment

In this blog post we’ll be talking about processing the emotions of fertility treatment. I’m aware this content may be triggering for some readers, so if it’s not for you - feel free to skip onto another one.

It’s worth mentioning that this post follows on from the one titled ‘Let’s Talk About Trying to Conceive’. What might help you to cope if you’re struggling to get pregnant?

Get all the support you can

First up - and this might sound obvious - but it’s really important to have support. Can you share your feelings with a close friend or relative? Would you consider joining a support network so that you have people to talk to who really understand what you’re going through? Would you like to talk to someone in complete confidence where you needn’t be afraid to share exactly how you feel, and be helped to deal with the whole experience, including relationship issues? If so, there are counsellors who specialise in working with people affected by infertility and you can find one through the British Infertility Counselling Association website, linked below.

Recognise how hard it is

Next, recognise that this is a really hard experience and you have good reason to feel whatever you feel - whether that’s angry, sad, frightened, anxious, bereaved or confused. Be kind to yourself. Try to do something nice for yourself every day – it doesn’t have to cost money or take a lot of time. Even 5-10 mins of ‘me’ time helps! For some it might be listening to a favourite song or calling a friend, taking a walk, reading a magazine or book – anything that brings you peace or joy.

woman_reading_pregnancy_test

Take charge

It’s been shown that people cope better with fertility treatment if they take an active interest in it rather than just let it happen to them. Ask questions when you see your doctor and read up about it so that you can understand what the treatment involves and why.

Have faith

It goes without saying that no one would choose to have a fertility problem, but keep in mind that assisted conception does help thousands of people to create the family they might otherwise never have had. So it offers genuine hope to you and everyone who decides to seek medical help!

positive_pregnancy_test

For more information about infertility and the treatment options you can check out each of the websites linked below.

The Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority

The website of the Regulatory Body for Assisted Conception has useful information and guidance many aspects of infertility and its treatment:

Infertility - NHS

Provides more information about Infertility and the treatment options

IVF What Happens 

BICA

Offers a listing of professionally qualified and accredited Infertility Counsellors

Fertility Network UK 

Offers support, information and contact with other people affected by infertility

Fertility Friends 

Another support forum for contact with other people affected by infertility

Daisy Network

Provides information and support to women diagnosed  with Premature Ovarian Insufficiency, also known as Premature Menopause.

If part of your journey to becoming pregnant has involved baby loss then be sure to check out our blog on how to cope with baby loss. 

couple hugging in a forest

Processing the Emotions of Fertility Treatment

couple hugging in a forest

In this blog post we’ll be talking about processing the emotions of fertility treatment. I’m aware this content may be triggering for some readers, so if it’s not for you - feel free to skip onto another one.

It’s worth mentioning that this post follows on from the one titled ‘Let’s Talk About Trying to Conceive’. What might help you to cope if you’re struggling to get pregnant?

Get all the support you can

First up - and this might sound obvious - but it’s really important to have support. Can you share your feelings with a close friend or relative? Would you consider joining a support network so that you have people to talk to who really understand what you’re going through? Would you like to talk to someone in complete confidence where you needn’t be afraid to share exactly how you feel, and be helped to deal with the whole experience, including relationship issues? If so, there are counsellors who specialise in working with people affected by infertility and you can find one through the British Infertility Counselling Association website, linked below.

Recognise how hard it is

Next, recognise that this is a really hard experience and you have good reason to feel whatever you feel - whether that’s angry, sad, frightened, anxious, bereaved or confused. Be kind to yourself. Try to do something nice for yourself every day – it doesn’t have to cost money or take a lot of time. Even 5-10 mins of ‘me’ time helps! For some it might be listening to a favourite song or calling a friend, taking a walk, reading a magazine or book – anything that brings you peace or joy.

woman_reading_pregnancy_test

Take charge

It’s been shown that people cope better with fertility treatment if they take an active interest in it rather than just let it happen to them. Ask questions when you see your doctor and read up about it so that you can understand what the treatment involves and why.

Have faith

It goes without saying that no one would choose to have a fertility problem, but keep in mind that assisted conception does help thousands of people to create the family they might otherwise never have had. So it offers genuine hope to you and everyone who decides to seek medical help!

positive_pregnancy_test

For more information about infertility and the treatment options you can check out each of the websites linked below.

The Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority

The website of the Regulatory Body for Assisted Conception has useful information and guidance many aspects of infertility and its treatment:

Infertility - NHS

Provides more information about Infertility and the treatment options

IVF What Happens 

BICA

Offers a listing of professionally qualified and accredited Infertility Counsellors

Fertility Network UK 

Offers support, information and contact with other people affected by infertility

Fertility Friends 

Another support forum for contact with other people affected by infertility

Daisy Network

Provides information and support to women diagnosed  with Premature Ovarian Insufficiency, also known as Premature Menopause.

If part of your journey to becoming pregnant has involved baby loss then be sure to check out our blog on how to cope with baby loss.