Low Milk Supply: What Does it Mean?

What does it mean if you’re experiencing a low milk supply?

Most mothers produce enough milk for their babies. Your milk supply is considered low when there is not enough breast milk being produced to meet your baby's growth needs. It’s worth noting here that only 1-5% of women don’t produce enough milk and it would usually be down to a medical condition that you would know about in advance.

Many mothers worry about their milk supply, especially in the early stages of breastfeeding. In fact, women who have stopped breastfeeding will most commonly say it was because they ‘didn't have enough milk’. However, most mothers do produce enough milk for their babies. If the breast milk supply is genuinely low it is usually a temporary situation and can be improved with appropriate support. If you are concerned about your supply it is important to seek advice from your midwife, a lactation consultant, breastfeeding counsellor or a GP.

Remember that the key to a supply which is sufficient for your baby’s needs is feeding against your baby's cues and not a schedule! If you want a schedule, then rest assured that after a few weeks of breastfeeding you will start to see a pattern you can plan around, but be aware it could change if your baby goes through a growth spurt or just wants to feed more for comfort or hydration.

For more advice on breastfeeding and beyond, head over to the ‘Prepare my mind’ section of the butterbean platform where you’ll find resources on feeding your baby with confidence, understanding your hormones and knowing your options.

hypnobirthing techniques

Low Milk Supply: What Does it Mean?

hypnobirthing techniques

What does it mean if you’re experiencing a low milk supply?

Most mothers produce enough milk for their babies. Your milk supply is considered low when there is not enough breast milk being produced to meet your baby's growth needs. It’s worth noting here that only 1-5% of women don’t produce enough milk and it would usually be down to a medical condition that you would know about in advance.

Many mothers worry about their milk supply, especially in the early stages of breastfeeding. In fact, women who have stopped breastfeeding will most commonly say it was because they ‘didn't have enough milk’. However, most mothers do produce enough milk for their babies. If the breast milk supply is genuinely low it is usually a temporary situation and can be improved with appropriate support. If you are concerned about your supply it is important to seek advice from your midwife, a lactation consultant, breastfeeding counsellor or a GP.

Remember that the key to a supply which is sufficient for your baby’s needs is feeding against your baby's cues and not a schedule! If you want a schedule, then rest assured that after a few weeks of breastfeeding you will start to see a pattern you can plan around, but be aware it could change if your baby goes through a growth spurt or just wants to feed more for comfort or hydration.

For more advice on breastfeeding and beyond, head over to the ‘Prepare my mind’ section of the butterbean platform where you’ll find resources on feeding your baby with confidence, understanding your hormones and knowing your options.