How Hollywood Gets Birth SO WRONG!

I’m about to reveal just how bad Hollywood’s depiction of birth is historically, and how it compares to reality.

The Hollywood drama

If films and TV shows are anything to go by when it comes to birth, it would seem that our waters break dramatically before we’re rushed to hospital in a frenzy. We arrive and there is lots of screaming and swearing, we see women curled up on their backs being coached to push until the chaos subsides and the baby is born and everything is calm again…you don’t need me to tell you that this is all completely inaccurate!

Lets imagine another scenario

If the reality of labour were to be filmed, you’d see a woman perhaps noticing a jelly-like substance in her knickers, or she might start getting irregular tightening around her bump. She might get a trickle of water between her legs, or she might get the full Hollywood waterworks or she might get no water leak at all.

If labour starts without the waters breaking, we may then spend several days watching her perform normal mundane tasks such as shopping, sleeping, and cooking. Once mild contractions start, she will likely be able to talk through them and hold conversation as usual. She may then reach a stage where contractions get closer together and this will stop her from being able to talk through them. When this happens she might need to focus on her breathing more in order to concentrate. She will want to move around and keep changing her position. Her waters usually  eventually break, and then and only then does she start to push in her calm, comfortable birth location with the lights down. One final push, and the baby is in her arms! You, the viewer, will have watched a ridiculously long and rather boring film of a woman acting intuitively, the majority of which will have taken place in the dark. Not exactly worth the watch!

pregnant_woman_hypnobirthing_relaxation

The most common time for waters to break

There is SO MUCH about birth that Hollywood gets wrong. Rather than the dramatic gush of water happening without any warning, its more common for waters to break once your cervix is dilated to about 10cm, when you will reach a point called transition. Your water breaking might come as a trickle, it may feel like a pop and then a gush of water or it may just be a bit that comes out…

Pre-labour water breaking

However, some women’s waters do break before labour starts and, if that happens, you’ll usually going into labour within 24 hours. If you do not, you will be offered an induction because, without amniotic fluid, there is a risk of infection for your baby. Remember that being at home means you are at less risk of infection because there are less foreign germs in your environment.

pregnant_woman_in_hospital_laying_over_birth_ball

Birth without waters breaking

It’s also possible that your waters don’t break during labour at all! Some babies are born still inside the amniotic sac, which is called being born ‘en caul’. Look it up - it’s amazing!

Let’s keep busting myths, reframing our fears and focusing on the facts. That’s what butterbean is here to help with! Be sure to explore our full platform for more empowering truth and reassurance.

You can find out more fascinating facts by signing up to become a butterbean member today!

 

pregnant_woman_holding_baby_bump

How Hollywood Gets Birth SO WRONG!

pregnant_woman_holding_baby_bump

I’m about to reveal just how bad Hollywood’s depiction of birth is historically, and how it compares to reality.

The Hollywood drama

If films and TV shows are anything to go by when it comes to birth, it would seem that our waters break dramatically before we’re rushed to hospital in a frenzy. We arrive and there is lots of screaming and swearing, we see women curled up on their backs being coached to push until the chaos subsides and the baby is born and everything is calm again…you don’t need me to tell you that this is all completely inaccurate!

Lets imagine another scenario

If the reality of labour were to be filmed, you’d see a woman perhaps noticing a jelly-like substance in her knickers, or she might start getting irregular tightening around her bump. She might get a trickle of water between her legs, or she might get the full Hollywood waterworks or she might get no water leak at all.

If labour starts without the waters breaking, we may then spend several days watching her perform normal mundane tasks such as shopping, sleeping, and cooking. Once mild contractions start, she will likely be able to talk through them and hold conversation as usual. She may then reach a stage where contractions get closer together and this will stop her from being able to talk through them. When this happens she might need to focus on her breathing more in order to concentrate. She will want to move around and keep changing her position. Her waters usually  eventually break, and then and only then does she start to push in her calm, comfortable birth location with the lights down. One final push, and the baby is in her arms! You, the viewer, will have watched a ridiculously long and rather boring film of a woman acting intuitively, the majority of which will have taken place in the dark. Not exactly worth the watch!

pregnant_woman_hypnobirthing_relaxation

The most common time for waters to break

There is SO MUCH about birth that Hollywood gets wrong. Rather than the dramatic gush of water happening without any warning, its more common for waters to break once your cervix is dilated to about 10cm, when you will reach a point called transition. Your water breaking might come as a trickle, it may feel like a pop and then a gush of water or it may just be a bit that comes out…

Pre-labour water breaking

However, some women’s waters do break before labour starts and, if that happens, you’ll usually going into labour within 24 hours. If you do not, you will be offered an induction because, without amniotic fluid, there is a risk of infection for your baby. Remember that being at home means you are at less risk of infection because there are less foreign germs in your environment.

pregnant_woman_in_hospital_laying_over_birth_ball

Birth without waters breaking

It’s also possible that your waters don’t break during labour at all! Some babies are born still inside the amniotic sac, which is called being born ‘en caul’. Look it up - it’s amazing!

Let’s keep busting myths, reframing our fears and focusing on the facts. That’s what butterbean is here to help with! Be sure to explore our full platform for more empowering truth and reassurance.

You can find out more fascinating facts by signing up to become a butterbean member today!